Category: General Interest

Categories

Do you need an accountant?

If you have set up a limited company, must you have an accountant? By law, no, you don’t require one. It’s not a statutory obligation. But you must prepare an annual set of accounts which need to be filed with Companies House and you must have a full set of corporate tax accounts to show HMRC.

For financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016, companies are also exempt from being audited, if they have at least two of the following:

  • an annual turnover of no more than £10.2 million
  • assets worth no more than £5.1 million
  • 50 or fewer employees on average

The only exception is if one of the shareholders who owns at least 10% of the shares demands an audit. 

What will an accountant do for you?  

It’s often thought that accountants just compile your accounts at year-end and submit your VAT  returns. A good accountant, however, will help with a wide range of other duties, such as:

  • Registering the company with the relevant tax departments – VAT, Corporation Tax, PAYE 
  • Setting up and running the company payroll, in line with the Real Time Information (RTI)  rules    
  • Monthly bookkeeping (with online accounting – you may prefer to do this yourself and save extra fees)
  • Dealing with the authorities on an ongoing basis (HMRC, Companies House)
  • Providing tax planning advice
  • Offering dividend advice
  • Providing professional references for mortgages, lettings, other services

Services will differ from accountant to accountant so make sure you know what is included. 

An accountant’s role is to provide you with advice. You may have a query about what expenses you can offset against Corporation Tax or be unsure as to whether you have enough retained profit to declare a dividend legally. Whatever the issue, it’s good to have an experienced professional on hand.  

One major advantage is that a professional accountant will be experienced in dealing with the tax authorities should an enquiry arise. They will know the correct format to submit any information and will understand the various subtleties of different regulations.   

If someone does decide to look after their own affairs, they need to be aware that they must maintain their accounts in line with the Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in the UK. It’s their responsibility to submit their information in a timely and accurate manner so as to meet statutory legislation.

On balance, most people decide that once they’ve calculated how long it takes to prepare the accounts, do the bookkeeping and liaise with HMRC, a small business accountant would save them both time and money, while enabling them to get on with running their business.

Sources
https://www.companybug.com/do-i-have-to-use-an-accountant-for-my-company/

https://www.gov.uk/audit-exemptions-for-private-limited-companies

How to get the best deals on a cruise

If you’re dreaming of getting away from the cold, dark days of winter, the idea of a last minute luxury cruise might have crossed your mind.

Unfortunately, however, gone are the days when you could just turn up on the quayside with your luggage and negotiate a deal. By law, cruise lines must submit their passenger manifests within 24 to 48 hours of departure. Nonetheless, there are some great offers to be found. 

‘Last minute’ is normally used in the industry to refer to a cruise due to sail anytime between several days and three months in the future. So keep your eyes peeled for travel agencies trying to fill ships for cruise lines as departure dates draw near. 

But as with any bargain, there are likely to be pros and cons, so bear the following points in mind:

Get your timing right 

The best time to find a bargain is about 60 to 90 days before the ship sails as this is the point by which travellers must have cancelled if they are not to incur a penalty. For some cruise lines, it can even be 120 days. Once the cruise line knows how many empty cabins are left, they will start to discount heavily.

Travel out of season

Not surprisingly, it won’t be the bestselling cruises that have last minute availability so be prepared to compromise on your dates. The most popular times for cruises are Christmas and New Year, Easter week or the August Bank Holiday so you’re unlikely to find any bargains on these dates but this still leaves several months throughout the year where you could be lucky. There’s usually lots of potential in the Mediterranen between October through to April.                  

Investigate ‘repositioning’ cruises

Unusual routes that don’t sell out also provide an opportunity for a good deal. Look out for ‘repositioning cruises’. These are when a vessel is changing region and needs to get back to its original port so it may take a different route than usual. Voyages can take 2 weeks or so rather than the usual 7 days and will include more sea days than normal with a variety of ports. Repositioning cruises can offer you an interesting itinerary at a reasonable price but be aware that because they will start in one port and end in another you could end up paying an expensive one-way air fare. The significant savings on the cruise though can still make it worthwhile.              

Shop around

Look around for the best deals. The cruise lines are bound by tight restrictions on travel agency discounting but agencies can have access to good deals depending on their booking bonuses.  Check the agencies’ web pages on a regular basis and sometimes it’s worth phoning up too as some admit they have low prices they can only tell customers about over the phone. 

Take careful note of what’s included – service fees, government taxes and port charges may not be part of the quoted price. Booking late inevitably means you’re getting what’s left over so you’re unlikely to get a balcony cabin or a prime dinner table but if you go with a flexible attitude, you could end up having the trip of a lifetime. Happy Sailing!

Sources
https://www.cruisecritic.co.uk/articles.cfm?ID=68

4 savvy tips when Christmas shopping

Christmas seems to come round earlier and earlier each year. Retailers start tempting ‘early gifters’ as soon as the Back to School stock has disappeared. And competitive Christmas light displays begin appearing in some neighbourhoods from as early as November. 

While this may run the risk of detracting from the main event, some preparation is good. So we’ve drawn up a list of our four top tips to help reduce the financial stress of Christmas. 

Has your Christmas gift circle got too wide?

Christmas is a time for giving. Agreed! But sometimes it becomes a sense of ‘obliged giving’. 

If you’re buying for a wide group of friends, colleagues and extended family, some of whom you really don’t know very well at all, maybe this is the year to be bold. Suggest a mutual agreement whereby you just stop. They may be just as glad as you not to get yet another pair of novelty socks or tube of exotic flavoured hand cream.

The real gift could be the relief of ‘not obliging them‘ to buy for you. And just think how much smaller ‘The Mountain of Unwanted Gifts’ will be come January.    

Think about alternatives 

If totally stopping buying presents for family members feels too radical, you might want to try one of the robo secret Santa schemes like Elfster or Drawnames that many workplaces use. That way, you’re only buying for one member of the family, you can set a limit and wish lists can be circulated. You can still treat the kids the traditional way, if you prefer!                       

Or you may decide to give charity gifts instead. Most of the main charities offer these schemes, offering gifts from life saving vaccines for children overseas to school supplies, clean water and goats! 

Points to bear in mind about gift cards

You may be buying for teenagers who really only want money so you may decide to go down the gift card route. Just be aware though, that if a retailer goes into liquidation (as some of the major ones have done in recent years, there’s little you can do to get your money back. This makes some of the multi-shop gift cards like Love 2Shop or One4all a safer bet as the recipient can still use the other shops in the scheme. Some of these cards do start reducing the balance by a certain amount each month, though, after a certain length of time. Make sure too that the recipient is aware of the expiry date so that it doesn’t become a wasted gift. 

If you are going to buy actual presents, always ask for a gift receipt so there is no issue with exchanges. Pay by credit card if the present is over £100 so that you’re covered should the firm go bust and the goods don’t arrive or are faulty. At least then, the card company is jointly liable      

Think about your online rights  

Don’t give up your consumer rights in the Christmas rush. Usually when you buy from the Internet you’ve got 14 days after the goods arrive to cancel the order and a further 14 days to send them back. But if you’ve ordered a Christmas present for someone online, the chances are that by the time the big day has arrived, that timeframe will have passed. So make sure you’re happy with the item before you start covering it in gift paper and squirreling it away. Some stores will extend their return policies in honour of the season of goodwill but they’re not obliged to so it’s always worth checking.

Sources
https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/shopping/christmas-savings/

Why reading is more ‘taxing’ for some

Books are zero-rated from VAT. Well, traditional printed books are.

If you wanted to read this year’s Booker prize shortlist in hardback, it would cost you approx £90 and there would be no VAT applied.   

A consumer tax of 20%, or VAT as we know it, is levied on all goods sold in the UK. There are some exceptions, however, which are zero-rated, such as children’s clothes, most food and, as mentioned, printed books.      

This is in line with the tradition that knowledge and learning should be accessible.

As Stephen Lotinga, the chief executive of the Publishers Association, explained, “It has been a long-standing principle that governments won’t seek to tax and provide a barrier to books, education and knowledge.” 

But it is not a level literary playing field.   

The zero-rating does not apply to audio books or e-books which can cost up to approx 50% more. Admittedly, while some of the extra cost of audio books is due to the recording costs and the hiring of actors, the levy plays its part in keeping prices high.     

To set this in context, the UK publishing industry generated £3.6bn in total book sales in 2018. Physical book sales accounted for £2.9bn and digital £653m.

The different tax classification discriminates against those who are blind, partially sighted and the elderly. With 2 million people in the UK classed as visually impaired, this is a significant issue. 

For people struggling to read, being able to listen to books or change the size of the font on the screen of their e-reader can have a huge impact.    

But the issue is also affecting the younger generation.The National Literacy Trust has said one in eight children from disadvantaged families do not own books. If books were available in digital formats at lower costs, it’s felt children from low income families would be more likely to access them on their phones or tablets.   

High profile authors and publishers, together with one hundred MP campaign supporters, are putting pressure on the Chancellor, Sajid Javid, to address this anomaly and bring an end to digital VAT in his Autumn Budget.

From a business perspective, the tax is also seen to be a barrier to encouraging innovation in digital formats. 

Let’s hope the story has a happy ending for all those disadvantaged readers and listeners who feel they are being unfairly penalised.

Marshmallows and financial planning

The Stanford marshmallow experiment is one of the most famous pieces of social science research out there. It has arguably influenced the way that many people live their lives, in addition to providing plenty of fun and interest for those with young children who are in the ‘I’ll try this at home’ camp.

So what is the marshmallow test? 

A marshmallow is placed in front of a child, they are told that they can have a second one if they can go 15 minutes without eating the first one – then they are left alone with the marshmallow.

As you can imagine, many children ate the marshmallow as soon as the door closed, others fidgeted and wiggled as they tried to restrain themselves, eventually giving in. A handful of children managed to wait the entire time. 

Following the experiment, the children were monitored as they grew up and it was found that those who waited for the second marshmallow performed better in exams, had a lower likelihood of obesity, lower levels of substance abuse and their parents reported that they had more impressive social skills. 

In other words, it could be said that the ability to delay gratification is a trait that leads to valuable rewards in the future. 

So how does this relate to financial planning?

The results from the experiment can easily be applied to the way you save and invest money. Simply put, if you save rather than spend now, you’ll gain greater rewards in the future. 

How do you delay gratification?

Cutting out frivolous and impulsive purchases are a good start. Think to yourself: ‘do I really need this?’ Do you have to buy a coffee from the coffee shop near work? Do you have to eat out twice a week? Small acts of restraint can lead to a big pay off in the future. 

When it comes to building a financial plan, it’s important to identify the levels of savings required for achieving goals in the future. Are you aiming for an early retirement or buying a holiday home? Setting out these goals early and developing a plan will help you to streamline your saving strategies so that you remain on track. Just remember, one marshmallow now or many marshmallows later.   

Whatever you want to purchase: a boat, a house or a car, delayed gratification is an extremely valuable skill to learn when it comes to achieving your financial milestones. The more you see your savings grow, the more motivated you will be to keep going. It’s good to see your hard work pay off and over the span of a few years, you could see dramatic increases in your wealth and financial security.

Sources
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/40-years-of-stanford-rese_b_7707444 guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAJdHRHqhlsVcLeV6Yi_w61XPEFBayOqdTK89gxGCEdCpDt8CZVAn9Nrzg_branVU7Z0eWhyD4CjX0ii8uQzgVRE2OrG17sknh-B4t_HwD35qNwzcMVc6QLH9ijLjmwCnjIQmyUvHDPtR5bme9Zu4p977cA_h2r1GWY6VIKl6hnAx&guccounter=2
https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2018/06/marshmallow-test/561779/
https://www.businessinsider.com/delayed-gratification-helped-me-save-money-2019-3?r=US&IR=T

8 places to visit this Autumn in the UK

With autumn pushing the heat of summer south across the equator, it’s time to strap on your wellies and get ready to kick through piles of fiery leaves. So to celebrate the change of season, here’s our list of places you should visit to make the most of the stunning autumn colours. 

Isle of Lewis, Hebrides

Autumn arrives early in the Outer Hebrides. The trees and fauna on the Isle of Lewis take on a fiery glow into September and October. The 270 acres of woods surrounding Lews Castle becomes something to behold. There are a whole host of walks for an intrepid hiker to choose from. 

Loch Lomond, West Dunbartonshire

The largest inland stretch of water in the UK by surface area, Loch Lomond is the centrepiece of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park. The second bonus from journeying to the area comes from the vast wooded glens that make up Great Trossachs National Nature Reserve. The Millennium Forest Trail is not a walk that should be missed, providing brilliant views of the loch and the surrounding woodland.    

Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire 

Ancient woodlands steeped in history and cultural heritage stemming back to the Iron Ages. The forest was then used by Anglo-Saxon kings as a royal hunting ground. There’s a huge range of activities to take part in during the autumn months, ranging from exhilarating zip wires to biking and sculpture trails. You can find out more here

New Forest, Hampshire

The treescapes of Wiltshire and Hampshire have been a place of autumnal brilliance for centuries. There are over 219 square miles of protected space, hosting oaks up to 800 years old and elderly beeches of 400 years or more. The New Forest Walking Festival takes place from the 13th of October until the 28th and is just one of the many outdoor pursuits you can get involved with during a visit. 

Rydal, Cumbria

Rydal is an area full of nostalgic ambience echoed in its literary history. The area has been the subject of many poems and stories and for almost 40 years Rydal Mount was home to the famous poet, William Wordsworth. Dora’s field is one of the bittersweet sights of the area, a field filled with hundred of daffodils between Rydal Mount and the main road, planted by Wordsworth following the death of his daughter. 

In the autumn, expect stunning misty mornings across the water that will make you feel like you’ve stepped into a poem. Rydal acts as a great jumping off point for exploring the rest of the Lake District and is worth a visit any time of year, let alone in the autumn. 

Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire

The 2000 acre park that surrounds the Baroque palace holds some of the most beautiful landscaped gardens in the country. In autumn, Blenheim hosts a series of seasonal events that you can find out more about here. There is a fantastic maze on site, buggy rides, fishing and even outdoor film screenings and concerts. The palace also plays host to art exhibitions and has hosted works by Andy Warhol alongside its own collection of historic British art. 

Guernsey, Channel Islands

The second largest Channel Island is a naturist’s wonderland. Covered in leafy enclaves and coastal rock faces to die for, there’s something for every nature lover out there. The Candie Gardens in St Peter Port is a must visit if you visit the island. There’s also a walking festival from the 15th until the 30th of September for those of you who love a good wander through beautiful coastal scenery. 

Stourhead, Wiltshire

Stourhead is a National Trust site, known for its stunning display of autumn colours. The house itself is a splendid visit, with its majestic stately rooms full of exquisite furnishings and historic art. The range of exotic trees will surely delight any visitors, especially when the North American maples turn scarlet red over the course of the season. 

There’s even a small cottage nestled amongst the trees in the garden where you can warm yourself by the fire with a nice cup of tea.

Blockchain: What is it?

If you’ve been following the advance of technology in the financial sector over the past decade, you’ve no doubt heard of blockchain, the record keeping technology which had its first real world application with Bitcoin. It is often described as a “distributed, decentralised, public ledger.” Though there are simpler definitions out there.

Importantly, blockchain has been cited as having the potential to significantly change the way we carry out financial transactions online. So what does it all mean?

At blockchain’s most basic level, it’s just that – a chain of blocks. The block is a piece of digital information which is stored in a public database, the chain. Rather than having one entity looking after the books, you have many computers working together. 

What is a block? 

Blocks are made up of three chunks of information:

  1. Date, time and amount.
  2. The transaction participants. Though instead of using your name, your purchase is recorded without any identifying information – you have a unique digital signature, kind of like a username. 
  3. Each block stores information that distinguishes from other blocks and is referred to as a “hash”. Think of it as a unique code to record the transaction. 

How does it all work?

When a block stores new data it is added to the blockchain. However, four things must happen for it to do so:

  1. A transaction has to occur.
  2. The transaction must be verified. This is usually done by a large network of computers across the globe. 
  3. The transaction must be stored in a block. Often with many other transactions. 
  4. The block must have its own unique hash. 

When that new block is added to the blockchain, it becomes publicly available to view. That’s right, anyone can see it. Looking at Bitcoin’s blockchain, you can see that each block has a time, a location and who it is relayed by. 

Is it private?

Anyone can view the contents of a blockchain. Users can also opt to connect their computers to the blockchain network. Their computer then receives a copy of the blockchain which is updated automatically when a new block is added. This might mean that a blockchain has thousands (sometimes millions) of copies. With such information being spread across such a wide network, it makes it very difficult to manipulate. Think of it as a massive verification network. 

The only information about users is limited to their digital signature or username. 

Is it secure?

Blockchain is, for the most part, secure. After a block is added to the end of a blockchain, it’s difficult to go back and edit the contents. Say a hacker wants to edit a purchase you’ve made on Amazon so that you made two purchases instead of one. When they edit the purchase it’ll change the hash (the unique code). A block contains both the hash of the current block and the hash of the previous block. 

In order for a hacker to change a single block, they would need to change every single block after it on the blockchain. Recalculating all those hashes would need an immense amount of computing power. The cost of organising an attack would vastly outweigh the benefits. 

So there you have it…

A quick summary of blockchain and how it works. If you want to get into the nitty gritty and find out more, the web is full of information on how it works and how it may change the way we do things in the future.

Sources
https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/blockchain.asp

https://www.blockchain.com/btc/blocks/1566913438346

https://bitcoin.org/en

How to find the right investment for you

In the wake of the Woodford debacle, there’s a lot of buzz around investments and the rationale for choosing them. So we thought it would be useful to outline what you should be thinking about when it comes to choosing an investment to enable you to get the best outcomes for your money.

Review your goals

It sounds obvious, but taking the time to think about what you want from your investments is key to selecting the correct fund for you. Writing down your needs, your goals and how much risk you may be prepared to take is a good starting point. 

Consider your investment’s lifespan

How soon will you need your money back? Timeframes will vary between goals and will affect the level of risk you are prepared to take. For example:

  • If you’re saving for a pension to be accessed in 30 years’ time, you can ignore short-term falls in the value of your investments and focus on the long term. Over longer periods, investments other than cash savings accounts tend to deliver a better chance of beating inflation.
  • If your goals are shorter term, i.e saving for a big trip in a couple of years, investments such as shares and funds might not be suitable as their value can fluctuate, so it may be best to stick to cash savings accounts. 

Make a plan

Once you’ve identified your needs, goals and risk levels, developing an investment plan can help you to find the sort of product that’s best for you. Low risk investments such as Cash ISAs are a good place to start. After that, it’s worth adding some medium-risk investments such as unit trusts if you’re comfortable with higher volatility. 

Adding higher risk investments is something you’ll only really want to approach once you’ve built up a few low to medium-risk products. However you should only do so if you’re willing to accept the risk of losing some or all of the money you put into them. 

Diversify, diversify, diversify

You’ve probably heard it before, but diversifying is a key part of investment planning. It’s a basic rule that to improve your chances of better returns, you have to accept more risk.  Diversification is an excellent method that improves the balance between risk and return by spreading your money across different investment types and sectors. 

Avoid high risks 

As mentioned above, it’s best to avoid high-risk investments unless you’re willing to accept the chance that you might not see any returns or even lose your investment. Adverts that proclaim to offer high levels of return will rarely come without risk and we’d urge caution before investing in anything that you’re not 100% certain about. If you do decide to pursue a high-risk product, it’s vital to make sure you fully understand the specific risks involved. 

With all investments comes a degree of risk, and returns can never be wholly guaranteed. Of course, we would always advise talking to an independent financial adviser. 

Sources
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48510235
https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/making-an-investment-plan
https://www.investorschronicle.co.uk/portfolio-clinic/2018/08/30/think-carefully-about-swapping-cash-for-bonds/
https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/top-tips-for-choosing-investments
https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/103015/cash-vs-bonds-what-pick-times-uncertainty.asp

Five Million pension savers at risk of falling prey to scammers

A joint warning from The Pensions Regulator (TPR) and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) says that five million pension savers could be risking their retirement pots due to scammers. Which has left people feeling, as you can imagine, a little bit worried. 

The regulators’ warning came after research revealed that 42% of pension savers could be at risk of falling for common tactics used by scammers. The survey questioned more than 2,000 adults aged 45 to 65 and came up with some rather astonishing results. 

The research suggested that cold calls, exotic investments and early access to cash are among the most effective tactics utilised by scammers. It later found that 60% of those who are actively looking for ways to boost their retirement income are likely to be hooked by a scam. 

Further to this, the survey found that 23% of those enrolled in pension schemes would pursue high risk, exotic opportunities if offered to them, while 17% said they would be interested in early access. Of all respondents, 23% said that they’d actually discuss their pension plans with a cold caller. 

Pensions and financial inclusion minister, Guy Opperman, said that scammers were, “nothing short of despicable.

“We know we can beat these callous crooks, because the message out there does work. Last year’s pension scams awareness campaign prevented hundreds of people from losing as much as £34m, and I’m backing this year’s efforts to be bigger and better.” 

Mark Steward, Executive Director of Enforcement and Market Oversight at the FCA, said: “It doesn’t matter the size of your pension pot – scammers are after your savings. Get to know the warning signs, and before making any decision about your pension, be ScamSmart and check you are dealing with an FCA authorised firm.“

The warning comes after the FCA revealed more than £197m was lost to scams in 2018. Two victims even lost more than £1m each! 

You can check out information on how to stop scammers on the FCA’s ScamSmart website

If you have any concerns about a phone call you’ve received or any other communications from an unfamiliar source, get in contact and we’ll make sure to steer you away from any scams.

6 UK dining experiences to feed your intrigue

Food is one of the greatest and most diverse pleasures that life has to offer – it can be simple, complex or anything in between. But a dining experience is another thing entirely. And there’s a whole range of different dining experiences available across the UK.

Dine on the water 

If the gentle lap of waves against the sides of a boat fits into your idyllic dining experience, you’re in luck. All over the country there are companies that offer river cruises where you can relax and enjoy a good meal while experiencing the many beautiful sights the UK has to offer. Canal Boat Cruises offer a series of countryside river cruises that are worth experiencing, whereas companies such as Bateaux London deliver fine dining sightseeing cruises in the capital for the metropolitan diner in you. 

Dine in the sky 

For those of you who’d like a more hair-raising dining experience, London in the Sky might be for you. Hanging 100ft above South Bank, 22 diners can enjoy breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails prepared by a team standing at the centre of the table. Offering an indulgent menu of food and/or drinks, London in the Sky is a unique dining experience that’s worth booking if you’re planning to visit the city. 

Dine on the rails

Steam trains have been a part of British culture for over a century and there’s a whole host of companies that offer nostalgic trips through the countryside, complete with an excellent meal or afternoon tea. Into the Blue have a great selection of luxury and steam train dining experience trips that appeal to anyone who loves travel and food. 

Dine in the dark

Going from seeing sights to seeing nothing at all, the next entry on our list is a sensory experience that’s not to be missed. Dans Le Noir Londonoffers a dining experience so innovative that it won the British Restaurant Awards Best Culinary Experience Award of 2017. Diners are hosted and served by visually impaired waiters with the aim of generating a very human exchange between staff and diners. It’s truly a revolutionary take on dining and is a string worth adding to any foodie’s bow. 

Dine on the roads

For those of you who prefer your dining experiences on tarmac, rather than river or rail, Bustronome offers a gourmet sightseeing tour of London’s famous landmarks. You can travel in style, while enjoying foodie treats on the upper floor of a glass topped double-decker. The menus are often inspired by the changing seasons and are worth checking out regardless!

Afternoon tea at the Ritz

How could we not talk about dining experiences without mentioning tea at the Ritz? Treating yourself to one of the world’s most decadent afternoon tea services is something we have to recommend. With 18 different choices of loose-leaf tea and a large mixture of sandwiches and cakes, it’s a perfect way to enhance any visit to the capital. 

So there you have it, a list of experiences to add to your bucket list. Whether you’re looking for fine dining with a twist or a chance to be a tourist with your tea, there’s something here for everyone.

Sources
https://canalboatcruises.co.uk/cruising-restaurant/
https://www.theritzlondon.com/dine-with-us/afternoon-tea/
https://www.bustronome.com/en/london/
https://london.danslenoir.com/en/home/
https://www.intotheblue.co.uk/culinary-gourmet/steam-train-restaurant/
https://londoninthesky.co.uk/
https://www.bateauxlondon.com/thames-river-cruises