Category: Investment

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Kids off to Uni? Congratulations – but have you been saving enough?

The Institute of Fiscal Studies suggests that the average total debt incurred by today’s university students over the duration of their studies will amount to £51,000. This figure comes as those in higher education saw the interest rate on student loans rise to 6.3% in September. Total student debt in the UK has now risen to £105 billion as of March 2018, a figure £30 billion higher than the nation’s total credit card debt.

The rising cost of higher education perhaps makes it unsurprising that 40% of parents are now beginning to save towards future university costs before their children have even been born, with one in five hoping to have saved £2,000 by the time the baby arrives. Frustratingly, however, around two thirds of those who are saving are doing so by simply placing the funds in an ordinary savings account, meaning their money is earning them very little in interest.

An alternative option to consider is a Junior ISA (JISA) in the child’s name, which they can then access when they turn 18. The account currently allows £4,128 to be saved every year, and the best rate market rate for a cash JISA offers 3.25%. Saving the maximum amount at that rate for ten years would result in a nest egg of £49,427 tax free to cover university fees with plenty left over for other expenses.

Whilst a cash JISA offers dependability, a stocks and shares JISA is also worth considering as the potential reward on your investment can be higher. Both types of JISA can be opened at the same time with the allowance shared between them, so spreading your savings between the two can pay off in the long run.

Using your pension to save towards your child’s university education is also an option, thanks to the pension freedoms of recent years. With the ability to take a lump sum to put towards fees and other costs when you turn 55, pensions offer a tax-efficient way of putting away for both your child’s future and your own. This is an option which needs careful planning, however, as you’ll need to make sure you have enough for your retirement before paying for your child’s education.

For those able to do so, it may also be worth speaking to your own parents about helping towards their grandchildren’s university costs. Rather than leaving money to a grandchild in their will, a grandparent might consider gifting towards fees and other expenses or placing the money in a trust, reducing their inheritance tax liability and allowing their grandchild to benefit from their legacy when they really need it.

http://www.independent.co.uk/money/spend-save/parents-university-fees-saving-children-born-student-loans-college-fund-tuition-51000-a7895951.htmlhttps://www.moneysavingexpert.com/news/2018/04/student-loan-interest-rates-expected-to-rise-in-september—but-dont-panic/researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN01079/SN01079.pdfhttps://www.moneyexpert.com/debt/uk-personal-debt-levels-continue-rise/

 

Agent Million visits London and Dorset this October

Summer travels may be over, however NS&I’s Agents Million continue their tours, spreading
news of £1 million jackpot wins to two lucky Premium Bond holders in London and Dorset.

October’s first jackpot winner, a man from Inner London, becomes the 51st jackpot winner in
the whole of London. His winning Bond was purchased in February 2016 when he
purchased the maximum investment of £50,000 (Bond number: 267FW537456).

Another man, this time from Dorset, has also hit the jackpot, winning the £1 million from a
£25 prize that was won in October 2010’s draw and reinvested into his total Premium Bonds
holding (Bond number: 173HT264915). He has £19,725 invested and becomes the ninth
jackpot winner in the county since the jackpot was introduced in 1994.  Agent Million last
visited the region in April 2018.

The pair become the 395th and 396th winners of the £1 million jackpot prize.

Jill Waters, Retail Director at NS&I, said:
“Re-investing Premium Bond prizes can be a great way of saving and it has paid off this
month for Dorset’s jackpot winner, scooping the £1 million jackpot from a £25 reinvested
prize. While the London winners’ savings habit has proved particularly fruitful, winning the
top prize just over two and a half years after investing.”

Customers can opt to have their prizes paid directly into their bank account, or to have their
prizes automatically reinvested into their Premium Bonds account, as long as the total
holding is below the maximum threshold of £50,000. More information about these options is
available on nsandi.com.

Do you have an unclaimed prize?
There are over 1.5 million unclaimed prizes worth just over £60 million.
In Inner London, there are over 119,000 unclaimed prizes worth nearly £4.8 million. These
prizes date back to June 1960, with a prize of £100. The highest unclaimed prize in the
region is £50,000, having been won in May 2016. The customer has £9,175 invested in
Premium Bonds and the winning Bond number is 33XT435809. There is also one £25,000
prize and four prizes of £10,000 waiting to be claimed.

In Dorset, there are over 18,000 unclaimed prizes worth £672,000. These prizes date back
to February 1964 with a prize of £25. There are also 17 prizes worth £1,000 each in the
region, with seven of these being won by customers with less than £10 invested in Premium
Bonds.

October 2018 prize draw breakdown

Value of prize & number of prizes

£1,00,000  – 2
£100,000 – 5
£50,000 – 10
£25,000 – 20
£10,000 – 49
£5,000 – 99
£1,000 – 1,795
£500 – 5,385
£100 – 24,622
£50 – 24,622
£25 – 3,083,096

Total prize fund value
£89,743,200
Total number of prizes
3,139,705

In the October 2018 draw, a total of 3,139,705 prizes worth £89,743,200 will be paid out.
There were 76,922,736,910 eligible Bonds for the draw.

Since the first draw in June 1957, ERNIE has drawn 416 million winning prizes, to the value of around
£18.7 billion.

Customers can find out if they have been successful in this month’s draw by downloading
the prize checker app for free from the App Store or Google Play, or visit the prize checker
at nsandi.com. The results are published in full on Tuesday 2 October.

Some Premium Bond Facts

1. All Premium Bonds prizes are free of UK Income Tax and Capital Gains Tax.
2. NS&I is one of the largest savings organisations in the UK, offering a range of
savings and investments to 25 million customers. All products offer 100% capital
security, because NS&I is backed by HM Treasury.
3. The annual Premium Bonds prize fund rate is currently 1.40% and the odds of each
individual Bond number winning any prize are 24,500 to 1.
4. Customers can buy Premium Bonds online at nsandi.com and over the phone by
calling 08085 007 007. This is a freephone number and calls to it from the UK are
free from both landlines and mobiles. Calls may be recorded. Customers can also
buy by post. Existing customers can also buy by bank transfer and standing order
and each investment must be at least £50 for bank transfers and standing orders.
5. Further information on NS&I, including press releases and product information, is
available on the website at nsandi.com. Follow us on Twitter: @nsandi or join the
conversation on Facebook: Premium Bonds made by ERNIE

interest rate rise: what does this mean?

goldfish jumping from small bowl to big bowlThe Bank of England has raised interest rates from 0.5% to 0.75%, only the second rise in a decade. Currently, interest rates stand at their highest since 2009 and reflect what the Bank of England perceive as a general pick-up in the economy.

The Bank said that a rise in household spending has strengthened the British economy. Economic growth for the year is predicted to be 1.4% this year and the unemployment rate is expected to fall further below 4.2%, where it currently stands.

How does the rise affect you?
If you are on a variable rate ‘tracker’ mortgage, your repayments will increase. For example, if you have a £100,000 mortgage, this will add £12 to your monthly repayments.

It’s important to highlight that if you are on a fixed rate mortgage, your payments will stay the same until your base rate comes up for renewal. The Bank of England’s announcement does not mean that your rates immediately rise.

For prospective borrowers, the interest rate rise signals a change in the Bank of England’s tone. Further rate rises are a definite possibility. However, the Bank’s governor took a rather cautious tone which indicates that there are unlikely to be any more rises until 2019.

For the time being, base rates on mortgages are unlikely to rise above 3%. That said, the demand for rate fixes will be higher than usual this year.

Unfortunately for those of you going on holiday, after the announcement the pound fell by 0.9% against the dollar. This is due to the extreme political uncertainty surrounding the sterling with Brexit taking an unchartable track.

Reactions from U.K. businesses have been a mixed bag. The Institute of Directors, which represents about 30,000 members in the U.K., has said, ‘the Bank has jumped the gun’, whilst the British Chamber of Commerce similarly described the decision as ‘ill-judged’ at an uncertain time.

This negative perspective wasn’t unanimous among all lobbying groups. The Confederation of British Industry, the country’s biggest business lobby, welcomed the rise saying the case for higher rates had been building.

A small rise of 0.25% is likely to have a minimal impact on your finances. However, larger hikes down the line could have a substantial effect on the British financial landscape.

Sources
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-02/pound-fails-to-shake-off-blues-despite-unanimous-boe-rate-hike
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/aug/02/how-will-interest-rate-rise-affect-mortgages-savings-and-property
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-02/-mark-carney-what-have-you-done-cry-u-k-business-bodies?utm_source=google&utm_medium=bd&cmpId=google

is the Bitcoin bubble close to bursting?

You may have seen Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson make the news at the end of January after becoming a Bitcoin millionaire. The rapper, actor and businessman made his 2014 album, Animal Ambition, available for purchase for a fraction of a Bitcoin upon release, making around 700 Bitcoin from sales. 50 Cent has admitted that he had forgotten about the earnings, which have sat untouched since 2014 and are now reportedly worth somewhere between £5 million and £6 million thanks to the meteoric rise of the cryptocurrency’s value in recent months.

Despite 50 Cent’s good fortune, those in the financial sector continue to warn against Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies as a sound investment. Alex Weber, chairman of global financial services company, UBS, is one of the latest figures to lend his voice to these warnings, describing cryptocurrencies as ‘not an investment we would advise.’

There have also been warnings from consultancy firms that initial coin offerings (ICOs), which raise funds by providing cryptocurrency tokens, are prime targets for cybercriminals. Ernst & Young analysed 372 ICOs which had raised $3.7 billion in total and found that hackers were taking as much as $1.5 million in proceeds from these each month with approximately $400 million stolen in total.

The announcements from governments worldwide that cryptocurrencies will soon be regulated has resulted in huge price fluctuations, with Bitcoin dropping from its high point of almost $20,000 in December 2017 to around half that towards the end of January 2018. The steep drop is due in part to the announcement by the government of South Korea, the third largest cryptocurrency market in the world, that its planned ban on the use of anonymous bank accounts in cryptocurrency trading would be implemented from 30th January.

Another concern surrounding cryptocurrency technology is the continued hype surrounding it, with companies taking advantage of investor buzz. The US Securities and Exchange Commission has warned that companies will be scrutinised over name and business model changes which have been made to capitalise on the hype.

Due to these developments in recent months, many economists are now predicting the cryptocurrency bubble could be about to burst. When, or if, this will happen remains to be seen, but the risks surrounding these relatively new forms of investment continue to be a worrying reality.
Sources
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jan/23/bitcoin-ubs-chairman-warns-against-cryptocurrency-investment-currency-falls
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2018/01/25/50-cent-becomes-accidental-bitcoin-millionaire-forgotten-investment/

4 savings habits of millionaires

There are no shortcuts or guarantees when it comes to achieving self-made millionaire status. That said, it can’t hurt to look at the financial habits of those who have managed to do just that to try and boost your own coffers. Here are our top tips from looking at those who’ve become millionaires by age 30. Who knows, they might just lead to you being worth seven figures in the future.

  1. Don’t rely on your savings – The current economic environment makes it very difficult to become wealthy through saving, so increasing your income is an obvious but good way to boost your bank balance. Whilst increasing your main salary can also be a challenge, you might think about other ways to achieve this such as earning passive income through property rental, or taking on freelance or consultancy work on the side (just keep an eye on any tax repercussions).
  2. Invest, invest, invest – Instead of saving for a rainy day, put your savings into investments. If you choose investments and accounts with restricted access to your funds, not only will this ensure your investments pay off, but it will also help you to focus on increasing your income rather than relying on money you’ve put away.
  3. Change your mindset – Nobody has ever become a millionaire without believing that it’s something they themselves can both achieve and control. The best way to do this is to invest in yourself. Spending time educating yourself about both your business area and the financial world in general will help you to understand how to capitalise on opportunities and genuinely believe you can increase your net worth.
  4. Make plans and set goals – You’ll only boost your wealth if you actually plan out how you’re going to do it. Before you can make a plan, however, you need to decide what you’re aiming for. If you really do want to become a millionaire, then think big: if you have a certain figure you want to achieve, aiming higher will help ensure you reach it or even surpass it.
    Sources
    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/9-things-to-do-in-your-20s-to-become-a-millionaire-by-30-a7377801.html

millennials on target to enjoy inheritance boom but not until they’re 61

A recent report has revealed that millennials are set to benefit from an ‘inheritance boom’ bigger than that experienced by any other generation in the post-war period. The Resolution Foundation, the think-tank which carried out the research, defined millennials as people currently aged between 17 and 35, and found that those within this age bracket will be left record amounts of wealth by their ‘baby boomer’ parents and grandparents.

The report found that inheritances will double in size over the next twenty years, peaking in 2035, as baby boomers who generally have high levels of wealth move through old age. Additionally, nearly two thirds of millennials have parents who are property owners, of which they may receive a share in the future. This is a stark difference to adults born in the 1930s, of whom only 38% received an inheritance.

However, the Resolution Foundation also stressed that the inheritance boom will not be a ‘silver bullet’ which allows millennials to get on the property ladder or address the wealth gaps which are currently growing in society, as most will only benefit from their inheritance when they themselves are nearing pension age. The average age at which people lose both parents is getting later; people who are currently between 25 and 35 are expected to be 61 years old when this happens.

Another key finding of the report was the strong correlation between the property wealth of millennials and the amount they are set to inherit from their parents, with those who were able to get on the property ladder during their early 20s, destined to benefit the most from the inheritance boom. The new inheritance tax housing allowance will also be fully implemented in 2020, meaning that as much as £500,000 per person will be able to be passed on without incurring tax, allowing millennials whose parents own valuable homes to cut their average tax burden in half.

In comparison, those millennials who do not own their own home by their mid thirties are much less likely to receive a large inheritance from their parents. Additionally, if they inherit this when in their 60s, they’ll then be much less likely to be able to secure a mortgage, meaning that some may struggle to climb onto the property ladder throughout both their working and retired lives.

Sources
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/12/30/millennials-will-pensioners-receiving-inheritance/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42519073

where did house prices increase and decrease the fastest in the UK in 2017?

Research into the housing market throughout 2017 has revealed the areas of the UK where property prices increased and decreased the most last year. Cheltenham in Gloucestershire was the place where prices grew at the fastest pace, with the average price of £313,150 marking a 13% rise – nearly five times the UK average increase of 2.7%. At the other end of the scale was the Scottish town of Perth, where prices dropped by 5.3% to make the average property price tag £180,687.

The places which saw the biggest growth were in southern England, with Bournemouth and Brighton coming in second and third place with rises of 11.7% and 11.4% respectively. At the other end of the scale, Scotland, Yorkshire and the Humber were the areas where the biggest falls were seen. The second-biggest fall in house prices was seen in Stoke-on-Trent (4%), with Paisley in third position (3.6%).

Fifteen out of the top twenty areas for house price increases are located in London and southern England. This is in spite of the capital overall seeing its average house price fall by 0.5%, thanks to the economy slowing down and consumers continuing to feel the effects following the Brexit vote of 2016.

The outlook for the year ahead offers little reprieve: many in the property sector, including the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, predict that the market in 2018 will, for the most part, remain flat, with some expecting property price growth to slow even further. Whilst this would be good news for those looking to take their first steps onto the property ladder, it’s more worrying news for people hoping to invest in the market.

It’s expected that the story will differ geographically, but property portal Rightmove has also predicted that different property types are likely to grow at different rates. They have forecast prices for homes with two bedrooms or fewer will rise by 3%, whilst three and four bedroom homes will see growth of only 2%.
Sources
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42539137
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/uk-house-price-increases-biggest-2017-cheltenham-bournemouth-brighton-london-housing-market-david-a8137366.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42555351

what does the current political climate mean for your savings and investments?

Whilst the country takes in the latest developments in the ongoing saga that is contemporary British politics, one question that many will be looking for answers to, is how the result of the general election is likely to affect them financially. It’s inevitable that savings and shares will be impacted upon in some way by Theresa May’s failure to convert her confidence in April into a larger majority in June and the resultant Conservative/DUP deal, as well as the wider ramifications the election outcome might have for the upcoming Brexit negotiations.

Following the election and the slight fall in the value of the pound, shares in many of the largest British companies went up. As companies dealing in dollars and other currencies benefit from a weakened pound, the FTSE 100 initially rose. However, ‘local’ companies dealing in sterling, such as Lloyds Banking Group, housebuilders Crest Nicholson and retailer Next all came out worse off, as did smaller companies linked to the UK economy.

As such, those with diversified pensions and ISA funds are likely to be no worse off than before the election, and doing significantly better than this time twelve months ago. However, it’s worth remembering that the uncertainty and volatility that are likely to be seen in UK politics in the coming days, weeks and months could result in shares and investments shifting further.

Whilst interest rates on both savings and mortgages were at historic lows before the election, capital markets pushed these still further down the day after polling day in order to absorb some of the shock of a result most had not predicted. This is just the latest setback for savers in a period which has seen rates declining consistently since the Bank of England lowered the Bank Rate from 0.5% to 0.25% in August 2016. With little competition between lenders, it’s more likely that rates will fall further than begin to climb any time soon.

The housing market too has been slowing since well before the election, making it a good time for those looking for a great deal on a mortgage to find one – but only if they meet the increasingly fastidious lending methods being used by lenders. The economic instability the country could potentially see in the coming months mean that criteria may tighten further, so those hoping to benefit from a low mortgage rate should do so sooner rather than later in order to avoid missing out.

Sources
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/funds/hung-parliament-nine-key-questions-personal-finances/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40215152

 

what impact will the election period have on my pension and ISAs?

The market reaction to Theresa May’s decision to call a snap general election to take place on 8th June was, thankfully, relatively minor. After reaching a record high in March 2017, the FTSE 100 dropped by 3% following the Prime Minister’s surprise announcement last month. Compared to the negative reactions experienced following both the 2012 eurozone crisis and the Chinese economy concerns at the start of 2016, this was reasonably slight.

Whilst the election period brings uncertainty, almost every general election in the last two decades has not caused the FTSE 100 to become more volatile in the weeks either side of election day. It’s therefore more than likely that the markets will continue without any major disruption, even if a new government comes into power. It’s usually only genuinely unexpected results which cause markets to rise or fall considerably, with the most recent example being the referendum vote for Brexit last year.

There are, however, still things you can do to minimise any impact of the election on your pension pot or savings accounts.

A well-diversified investment portfolio – a mixture of bonds, shares, property and cash across different sectors and countries – means you’ll be spreading risk and making it more likely that a rise in one sector will soften the blow of a fall in another. It’s likely that you’ll have a particular outcome in mind for your investments, whether that’s securing your retirement in the future or reaching a particular financial goal by a certain time, so sticking to this is the right thing to do rather than becoming distracted by any short-term ups and downs in the markets.

Look out for any investment perks that are brought in soon after the election result as in order to raise revenue, most new governments will introduce policies to help you grow your finances. Don’t forget about the benefits already available to you either, such as ISA and pension allowances, as these can also be a good way to protect your savings from any market volatility. Lastly, drip feeding your investments month by month can be a good way to combat uncertain markets – you might not capitalise fully on a market high, but you’ll avoid losing out during any sudden lows.

Sources:
http://www.which.co.uk/news/2017/04/how-will-the-general-election-affect-my-pensions-and-isa/

how to pass on ISAs after you’re gone

ISAs have long been regarded as a simple and effective way of protecting your savings from the taxman, with the increased limit now allowing you to shelter up to £20,000 of your savings a year from being taxed. Whilst this can be a great help in protecting your nest egg during your own life, you’ll also want to know that your hard-earned savings will be safe after the event of your death so that as much of the money you’ve accumulated as possible can go to those you leave behind.

Thankfully, in the case of a spouse, this need not be a worry. The government introduced legislation in 2015 which means that surviving husbands, wives or civil partners can inherit an ISA from their other half with the tax-free wrapper remaining intact. The ISA will also not be subject to inheritance tax (IHT) if it’s being passed on to your spouse.

However, if you’re leaving an ISA to another family member, such as a child, the amount held in the account is still considered to be part of your estate. It could therefore be a contributing factor in pushing your assets over the amount that can be left to someone else without incurring tax, known as the ‘nil rate band’. As IHT is payable at a rate of 40%, this could put a serious dent in the amount your loved ones will actually receive after you’re gone.

If your savings are likely to push your estate above the nil rate band, there are options available to reduce the amount taken by the taxman. It’s now easier to safeguard your pension from IHT, no matter who you’re planning to leave it to. Those hoping to leave their money to someone other than a spouse or partner might consider keeping their money in a pension and live off their ISA income as far as possible, thereby being able to pass on their pension pot to a loved one without incurring tax upon it. It’s important to remember that not all pensions are set up to allow this, so it’s normally a good idea to seek professional advice about the best way to protect your estate from being taxed before making any plans for your savings.

Sources
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/special-reports/can-i-transfer-an-isa-on-death-without-penalty/
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/financial-services/investments/inheritance-tax/isa-tax-rules/
http://www.which.co.uk/money/savings-and-isas/isas/guides/cash-isas/can-you-inherit-an-isa