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How can millennials get on the property ladder?

There’s been a lot of talk in the press recently about generational inequality, which has mostly been with good reason. Those currently in their twenties and thirties are earning far less than people the same age did 10 to 15 years ago.

The 2008 recession has put the millennial cohort far behind in terms of earnings and wages. Wages have never fully recovered since the recession and are still behind their pre-financial crisis peak. Many may be unable to ever afford to get on the property ladder, meaning they will have a lifetime of rent payments to fund.

Also, rising house prices have meant that the average deposit has risen from around £10,000 in the Eighties and Nineties to between £50,000-60,000 today, according to analysis by accounting firm PwC. Even when adjusted for inflation, the rise is dramatic.

Auto-enrolment in pension schemes has begun to address some of the long term issues around retirement funding but even still, these do not compare to the security offered by ‘gold-plated’ direct contribution schemes.

The younger generation are already aware that they will have to work far longer. Early retirement will likely be the premise of the rich, lucky or extremely frugal. Fortunately, millennials look set to be able to cope with the demands of a longer working life. The younger generation are fitter and healthier compared to previous generations with far fewer smokers and better diets.

Although a longer working life might be a path towards an eventual retirement, it does little to help young people get on the housing ladder. The fact of the matter is that many young people will need some kind of ‘leg up’ if they are to achieve the financial stability that many of the ‘baby-boomer’ generation managed.

The income gap between older and younger generations means that many young workers will have to rely on the wealth accumulated by their parents and grandparents if they are to sustain the same quality of life.

Family loans have become increasingly important for the financial wellbeing of young people. Many are giving younger generations so-called ‘early inheritances’ in the hope that such loans will enable them to get a foot on the property ladder. This is already so widespread that nearly eight out of 10 first-time buyers in London are receiving some sort of financial help from their parents.

Parents and grandparents are funding help through a variety of means. Almost three quarters of parents used their life savings to help out with the cash, while a third downsized or released equity from their homes. Another third accessed pensions cash; either cashing in lump sums through income drawdown or annual annuities. 7% remortgaged and 6% took out a loan themselves.

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Sources
Sunniva Kolostyak “Fireworks for millennials” in Pensions Age, November 2018
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/personal-banking/mortgages/baby-boomer-vs-gen-y-homebuying-in-1982-compared-to-2016/

Pension drawdown in an era of long life expectancies

Pension drawdown in an era of long life expectancies

Retirement planning means taking into account a whole host of factors. You have to navigate tough questions like, ‘What will the impact of inflation be?’ or ‘When will interest rates start to creep up?’

As well as these, there is another question that must be considered: ‘How long will you live?’

This question is unanswerable but figures suggest that some pensioners might be getting this figure very wrong when it comes to drawdown. Many are running the risk that their retirement pot kicks the bucket before they do.

Research by AJ Bell indicates that 50% of people aged 55-59 who’ve entered income drawdown say they have only enough savings to tide them over for 20 years. This might sound like a long time but when you consider that average life expectancy for this cohort of savers is 82 for men and 85 for women, many risk running out of money.

The reality is that none of us know how long we will live. When you factor in that there’s a fair chance that a few of AJ Bell’s respondents might live to 90 or even 100, it’s clear that many pensioners could be drawing from their savings at an unsustainable rate.

Withdrawal rates

AJ Bell also asked their respondents about their withdrawal rates. They discovered that 57% of people in the 55 to 59 age bracket are withdrawing more than 10% of their fund each year. This reduces to 43% of people in the 60 to 64 age bracket and 34% of people in the 65 to 69 age bracket.

While many use their early retirement to travel and embark on their larger plans, over-withdrawing early on could mean that they end up without the money to cover costs that arise in later life, such as care costs.

The average size of the fund in AJ Bell’s questionnaire was £118,000. Based on this, a 10% annual withdrawal of £11,800 would result in the income lasting just 12 years. However, if the withdrawal is reduced to 6% of starting value, the same fund might last for 29 years. These estimations don’t take into account the detrimental impact of inflation, which currently runs at 2.7%.

Working out a sustainable drawdown rate is difficult and depends on a whole range of factors. Your regulated financial adviser or planner should be able to give you your best chance of a good retirement outcome.

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Sources
https://www.retirement-planner.co.uk/232530/tom-selby-life-expectancy-guessing-game

4 ways to live a happy retirement



Retirement should be the time of your life. No more early alarm calls, no more commuting and no more carefully counting your holiday allocation. Instead, you have the freedom to do exactly as you please. Yet retirement might not always work out as the idyllic move to a cottage by the sea it’s billed to be. Some people, in fact, dread retirement and feel they’re being put out to grass. They fear they’ll miss the structure and companionship that work gives. Think of it more as ‘change’ not ‘old age’

Think of it more as ‘change’ not ‘old age’

Retirement is automatically associated with old age in people’s minds. The very word conjures up images of people sitting around in retirement homes in their slippers, watching daytime T.V. But this is far from the truth. Old age, today, encompasses a vast span of years, from 65 to 100. There are many active retirees living life to the full. And if you think how much the average person’s life changes between 25 and 60, just think how many possibilities could lie ahead in the same timeframe. Going from work to retirement is a huge transition – yet people cope with many other major transitions during the course of their lives; having a baby, changing jobs, going through a divorce, moving house. The key is to use your resilience and strength from previous times of change to help as you move into retirement. Don’t see it as entering old age, see it more as a time of embracing life’s opportunities.

Don’t just be concerned about the money side of things

That may sound a curious thing to read in a financial newsletter. And pensions will form a key part of any more retirement planning. There’s also no denying that pensions can be complex so it’s important to find the right solution for your situation whether it’s taking an income or accessing a lump sum. But the financial side of things is much wider than just your pension. So take time to think about what your ideal lifestyle would look like. Think about some proper financial planning. What are your goals and ambitions for retirement? Are your current finances on track to help you reach them? The money is just an ends to enable you to live a happy retirement and find a new purpose.

Be clear in your mind what you really want to do

In today’s world, where such value is placed on career status, retirement can be seen as an end rather than a new beginning. But you don’t have to be in paid employment to be happy and fulfilled. You may, in fact, find you achieve far more satisfaction in life after work. Why not do something you’ve always wanted to but never had time to? Learn to play a musical instrument, take up a sport, sign up for some volunteering, enrol on a course, get involved in a conservation project, travel the world… This is your time to do as you please. Remember, you don’t have to be constantly busy – sit back and reflect on your true values.

Adopt a proactive mindset

You often hear stories of people becoming ill, or even dying, within months of stopping work – a cruel twist of fate after they’ve laboured hard for years, looking forward to their retirement. According to the Office for National Statistics, though, health and wellbeing do actually increase in retirement while depression and anxiety often fall. This is as people have more time to adopt a healthy lifestyle and find new sources of fulfilment and exercise. The key seems to be to make a determined effort to stay sharp, be proactive and keep stretching your boundaries. It may sound surprising but workaholics often love retirement as much as they loved their careers.

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Sources

Sources
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/oct/06/life-keeps-evolving-six-ways-to-have-a-happy-retirement

3 pension changes you may have missed in the Budget

There was scarcely a mention of the ‘P’ word in October’s Budget speech (believe us, we were listening closely for it!). Instead, Hammond used the Budget speech as an opportunity to unveil his ‘rabbit in the hat’ changes to income tax thresholds, an increase in NHS mental health funding and a ban on future PFI contracts.

However, we had a good read of the accompanying ‘Red Book’ for any mention of pensions. At 106 pages, this was no mean feat. Fortunately, though, it was time well spent as we found some changes to pensions you may otherwise have missed:

The pension dashboard

HM Treasury confirmed that the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) would look at designing a pension dashboard which would include your state pension. The pensions dashboard will be an online platform that will let you see all of your pension schemes in a single view. The average worker is nowadays expected to work eleven jobs during their career and keeping track of so many pension pots could prove confusing to say the least.

There was an extra £5 million of funding for the DWP to help make the pension dashboard a reality. Commentators see the dashboard as a welcome sign that the government is committed to helping savers keep track of their funds.

Patient capital funding

The government announced a pensions investment package which should make it easier for direct contribution pension schemes to invest in patient capital. Patient capital refers to investments that forgo immediate returns in anticipation of more substantial returns further down the line.

The government may review the 0.75% charge cap and there is widespread speculation that it will be increased to allow more investment in high growth companies.

Cold calling ban

The government has promised to ban pensions cold calling as part of a drive against pension scammers. Almost two years since the government’s initial proposals to combat pension scams were announced, pensions cold calling will finally be made illegal.

Research by Prudential indicates that one in 10 over 55s fear they have been targetted by pensions scammers since the introduction of pension freedoms in 2015. Cold calls, with offers to unlock or transfer funds, are a frequently used tactic to defraud people of their retirement savings.

As much as these measures go a long way to making people’s pensions more secure, the government will be powerless to enforce cold calls made from abroad and not on behalf of a UK company. It is unclear how and if the government will work with international regulators to mitigate the dangers of such calls.

Sources
https://www.moneyobserver.com/news/budget-2018-three-pensions-changes-you-may-have-missed

interest rate update: will low rates stay for another three years?

The decision by the Bank of England to cut interest rates to a record low of 0.25% in August last year was the latest blow for savers who hold a high percentage of their assets in cash. 2017 brings fresh economic uncertainty both at home and around the world through the triggering of Article 50 following the Brexit vote and the inaugural year of President Trump’s time in the Oval Office, leading many to question just how long the current rate of interest will be in place.

One prediction has come from Howard Archer, IHS Markit’s chief European and UK economist, who recently stated: “It looks more likely than not that the Bank of England will keep interest rates unchanged, not only through 2017 but maybe out to 2020”. If Archer’s forecast is accurate, it could mean another three years of low yields for savers. Conversely, those looking to borrow would likely be overjoyed, as the cost of loans and mortgages could continue to fall.

Others have been less pessimistic, but still see a rates rise in 2017 as an unlikely proposition. One senior analyst at a top financial services company puts the chance of interest rates increasing this year at just one in three. “We are getting another year of ultra low interest rates”, he added. “Rates may then start to go up but they are going to go up very slowly. We are probably going to be hereabouts for some considerable time. It depends on how next year turns out in terms of economic growth.”

There have been predictions that governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney will have no choice but to raise rates this year due to the economy recovering far better than expected following the Brexit vote. One senior figure believes that a continued increase in consumer unsecured lending would lead to the Bank of England increasing rates in 2017 to avoid the creation of another credit bubble.

All of which makes it difficult to say with any certainty how long the 0.25% rate will be in place. Whilst it now looks fairly certain that any plans to lower rates even further have been abandoned, the unpredictable nature of the UK economy means that, when it comes to a rates increase, savers may simply have to wait and see what 2017 has in store.

Sources

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-4080276/Savers-set-three-years-misery-analysts-predict-rates-stay-record-lows.html
http://www.whatinvestment.co.uk/mark-carney-might-raise-uk-interest-rates-2017-2553174/
http://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/743836/interest-rates-when-rise-UK-rate-Bank-of-England-latest-predictions-forecasts